Dyadic Behavior Analysis in Depression Severity Assessment Interviews (bibtex)
by Scherer, Stefan, Hammal, Zakia, Yang, Ying, Morency, Louis-Philippe and Cohn, Jeffrey F.
Abstract:
Previous literature suggests that depression impacts vocal timing of both participants and clinical interviewers but is mixed with respect to acoustic features. To investigate further, 57 middle-aged adults (men and women) with Major Depression Disorder and their clinical interviewers (all women) were studied. Participants were interviewed for depression severity on up to four occasions over a 21 week period using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), which is a criterion measure for depression severity in clinical trials. Acoustic features were extracted for both participants and interviewers using COVAREP Toolbox. Missing data occurred due to missed appointments, technical problems, or insufficient vocal samples. Data from 36 participants and their interviewers met criteria and were included for analysis to compare between high and low depression severity. Acoustic features for participants varied between men and women as expected, and failed to vary with depression severity for participants. For interviewers, acoustic characteristics strongly varied with severity of the interviewee's depression. Accommodation - the tendency of interactants to adapt their communicative behavior to each other - between interviewers and interviewees was inversely related to depression severity. These findings suggest that interviewers modify their acoustic features in response to depression severity, and depression severity strongly impacts interpersonal accommodation.
Reference:
Dyadic Behavior Analysis in Depression Severity Assessment Interviews (Scherer, Stefan, Hammal, Zakia, Yang, Ying, Morency, Louis-Philippe and Cohn, Jeffrey F.), In Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Multimodal Interaction, ACM Press, 2014.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{scherer_dyadic_2014,
	address = {Istanbul, Turkey},
	title = {Dyadic {Behavior} {Analysis} in {Depression} {Severity} {Assessment} {Interviews}},
	isbn = {978-1-4503-2885-2},
	url = {http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2663204.2663238},
	doi = {10.1145/2663204.2663238},
	abstract = {Previous literature suggests that depression impacts vocal timing of both participants and clinical interviewers but is mixed with respect to acoustic features. To investigate further, 57 middle-aged adults (men and women) with Major Depression Disorder and their clinical interviewers (all women) were studied. Participants were interviewed for depression severity on up to four occasions over a 21 week period using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD), which is a criterion measure for depression severity in clinical trials. Acoustic features were extracted for both participants and interviewers using COVAREP Toolbox. Missing data occurred due to missed appointments, technical problems, or insufficient vocal samples. Data from 36 participants and their interviewers met criteria and were included for analysis to compare between high and low depression severity. Acoustic features for participants varied between men and women as expected, and failed to vary with depression severity for participants. For interviewers, acoustic characteristics strongly varied with severity of the interviewee's depression. Accommodation - the tendency of interactants to adapt their communicative behavior to each other - between interviewers and interviewees was inversely related to depression severity. These findings suggest that interviewers modify their acoustic features in response to depression severity, and depression severity strongly impacts interpersonal accommodation.},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of the 16th {International} {Conference} on {Multimodal} {Interaction}},
	publisher = {ACM Press},
	author = {Scherer, Stefan and Hammal, Zakia and Yang, Ying and Morency, Louis-Philippe and Cohn, Jeffrey F.},
	month = nov,
	year = {2014},
	keywords = {Virtual Humans, UARC},
	pages = {112--119}
}
Powered by bibtexbrowser