Learning intercultural communication skills with virtual humans: Feedback and fidelity. (bibtex)
by Lane, H. Chad, Hays, Matthew Jensen, Core, Mark G. and Auerbach, Daniel
Abstract:
In the context of practicing intercultural communication skills, we investigated the role of fidelity in a game-based, virtual learning environment as well as the role of feedback delivered by an intelligent tutoring system. In 2 experiments, we compared variations on the game interface, use of the tutoring system, and the form of the feedback. Our findings suggest that for learning basic intercultural communicative skills, a 3-dimensional (3-D) interface with animation and sound produced equivalent learning to a more static 2-D interface. However, learners took significantly longer to analyze and respond to the actions of animated virtual humans, suggesting a deeper engagement. We found large gains in learning across conditions. There was no differential effect with the tutor engaged, but it was found to have a positive impact on learner success in a transfer task. This difference was most pronounced when the feedback was delivered in a more general form versus a concrete style.
Reference:
Learning intercultural communication skills with virtual humans: Feedback and fidelity. (Lane, H. Chad, Hays, Matthew Jensen, Core, Mark G. and Auerbach, Daniel), In Journal of Educational Psychology, volume 105, 2013.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{lane_learning_2013,
	title = {Learning intercultural communication skills with virtual humans: {Feedback} and fidelity.},
	volume = {105},
	issn = {1939-2176, 0022-0663},
	shorttitle = {Learning intercultural communication skills with virtual humans},
	url = {http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0031506},
	doi = {10.1037/a0031506},
	abstract = {In the context of practicing intercultural communication skills, we investigated the role of fidelity in a game-based, virtual learning environment as well as the role of feedback delivered by an intelligent tutoring system. In 2 experiments, we compared variations on the game interface, use of the tutoring system, and the form of the feedback. Our findings suggest that for learning basic intercultural communicative skills, a 3-dimensional (3-D) interface with animation and sound produced equivalent learning to a more static 2-D interface. However, learners took significantly longer to analyze and respond to the actions of animated virtual humans, suggesting a deeper engagement. We found large gains in learning across conditions. There was no differential effect with the tutor engaged, but it was found to have a positive impact on learner success in a transfer task. This difference was most pronounced when the feedback was delivered in a more general form versus a concrete style.},
	language = {en},
	number = {4},
	journal = {Journal of Educational Psychology},
	author = {Lane, H. Chad and Hays, Matthew Jensen and Core, Mark G. and Auerbach, Daniel},
	month = nov,
	year = {2013},
	keywords = {Learning Sciences, UARC},
	pages = {1026--1035}
}
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