Social influence of humor in virtual human counselor's self-disclosure (bibtex)
by Kang, Sin-Hwa, Krum, David M., Khooshabeh, Peter, Phan, Thai, Chang, Chien-Yen, Amir, Ori and Lin, Rebecca
Abstract:
We explored the social influence of humor in a virtual human counselor's selfdisclosure while also varying the ethnicity of the virtual counselor. In a 2 × 3 experiment (humor and ethnicity of the virtual human counselor), participants experienced counseling interview interactions via Skype on a smartphone. We measured user responses to and perceptions of the virtual human counselor. The results demonstrate that humor positively affects user responses to and perceptions of a virtual counselor. The results further suggest that matching styles of humor with a virtual counselor's ethnicity influences user responses and perceptions. The results offer insight into the effective design and development of realistic and believable virtual human counselors. Furthermore, they illuminate the potential use of humor to enhance self‐disclosure in human–agent interactions.
Reference:
Social influence of humor in virtual human counselor's self-disclosure (Kang, Sin-Hwa, Krum, David M., Khooshabeh, Peter, Phan, Thai, Chang, Chien-Yen, Amir, Ori and Lin, Rebecca), In Computer Animation and Virtual Worlds, volume 28, 2017.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{kang_social_2017,
	title = {Social influence of humor in virtual human counselor's self-disclosure},
	volume = {28},
	issn = {15464261},
	url = {http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/cav.1763},
	doi = {10.1002/cav.1763},
	abstract = {We explored the social influence of humor in a virtual human counselor's selfdisclosure while also varying the ethnicity of the virtual counselor. In a 2 × 3 experiment (humor and ethnicity of the virtual human counselor), participants experienced counseling interview interactions via Skype on a smartphone. We measured user responses to and perceptions of the virtual human counselor. The results demonstrate that humor positively affects user responses to and perceptions of a virtual counselor. The results further suggest that matching styles of humor with a virtual counselor's ethnicity influences user responses and perceptions. The results offer insight into the effective design and development of realistic and believable virtual human counselors. Furthermore, they illuminate the potential use of humor to enhance self‐disclosure in human–agent interactions.},
	number = {3-4},
	journal = {Computer Animation and Virtual Worlds},
	author = {Kang, Sin-Hwa and Krum, David M. and Khooshabeh, Peter and Phan, Thai and Chang, Chien-Yen and Amir, Ori and Lin, Rebecca},
	month = apr,
	year = {2017},
	keywords = {MedVR, MxR, UARC, ARL, DoD}
}
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