The Appraisal Equivalence Hypothesis: Verifying the domain-independence of a computational model of emotion dynamics (bibtex)
by Gratch, Jonathan, Cheng, Lin and Marsella, Stacy
Abstract:
Appraisal theory is the most influential theory within affective computing, and serves as the basis for several computational models of emotion. The theory makes strong claims of domain-independence: seemingly different situations, both within and across domains are claimed to produce the identical emotional responses if and only if they are appraised the same way. This article tests this claim, and the predictions of a computational model that embodies it, in two very different interactive games. The results extend prior empirical evidence for appraisal theory to situations where emotions unfold and change over time.
Reference:
The Appraisal Equivalence Hypothesis: Verifying the domain-independence of a computational model of emotion dynamics (Gratch, Jonathan, Cheng, Lin and Marsella, Stacy), In Proceedings of ACII 2015, IEEE, 2015.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{gratch_appraisal_2015,
	address = {Xi'an, China},
	title = {The {Appraisal} {Equivalence} {Hypothesis}: {Verifying} the domain-independence of a computational model of emotion dynamics},
	url = {http://ict.usc.edu/pubs/The%20Appraisal%20Equivalence%20Hypothesis-Verifying%20the%20domain-independence%20of%20a%20computational%20model%20of%20emotion%20dynamics.pdf},
	abstract = {Appraisal theory is the most influential theory within affective computing, and serves as the basis for several computational models of emotion. The theory makes strong claims of domain-independence: seemingly different situations, both within and across domains are claimed to produce the identical emotional responses if and only if they are appraised the same way. This article tests this claim, and the predictions of a computational model that embodies it, in two very different interactive games. The results extend prior empirical evidence for appraisal theory to situations where emotions unfold and change over time.},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of {ACII} 2015},
	publisher = {IEEE},
	author = {Gratch, Jonathan and Cheng, Lin and Marsella, Stacy},
	month = sep,
	year = {2015},
	keywords = {Social Simulation, Virtual Humans, UARC}
}
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