Preface (bibtex)
by Gordon, Andrew S., Miller, Rob, Morgenstern, Leora and Turán, György
Abstract:
A few years after the 1956 Dartmouth Summer Workshop [1, 2], which first established artificial intelligence as a field of research, John McCarthy [3] discussed the importance of explicitly representing and reasoning with commonsense knowledge to the enterprise of creating artificially intelligent robots and agents. McCarthy proposed that commonsense knowledge was best represented using formal logic, which he viewed as a uniquely powerful lingua franca that could be used to express and reason with virtually any sort of information that humans might reason with when problem solving, a stance he further developed and propounded in [4, 5]. This approach, the formalist or logic-based approach to commonsense reasoning, was practiced by an increasing set of adherents over the next several decades [6, 7], and continues to be represented by the Commonsense Symposium Series, first held in 1991 [8] and held biennially, for the most part, after that.
Reference:
Preface (Gordon, Andrew S., Miller, Rob, Morgenstern, Leora and Turán, György), In Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence, 2020.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{gordon_preface_2020,
	title = {Preface},
	issn = {1012-2443, 1573-7470},
	url = {http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10472-020-09711-5},
	doi = {10.1007/s10472-020-09711-5},
	abstract = {A few years after the 1956 Dartmouth Summer Workshop [1, 2], which first established artificial intelligence as a field of research, John McCarthy [3] discussed the importance of explicitly representing and reasoning with commonsense knowledge to the enterprise of creating artificially intelligent robots and agents. McCarthy proposed that commonsense knowledge was best represented using formal logic, which he viewed as a uniquely powerful lingua franca that could be used to express and reason with virtually any sort of information that humans might reason with when problem solving, a stance he further developed and propounded in [4, 5]. This approach, the formalist or logic-based approach to commonsense reasoning, was practiced by an increasing set of adherents over the next several decades [6, 7], and continues to be represented by the Commonsense Symposium Series, first held in 1991 [8] and held biennially, for the most part, after that.},
	journal = {Annals of Mathematics and Artificial Intelligence},
	author = {Gordon, Andrew S. and Miller, Rob and Morgenstern, Leora and Turán, György},
	month = sep,
	year = {2020},
	keywords = {Narrative}
}
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