Human swarm interaction using plays, audibles, and a virtual spokesperson (bibtex)
by Chaffey, Patricia, Artstein, Ron, Georgila, Kallirroi, Pollard, Kimberly A., Nasihati Gilani, Setareh, Krum, David M., Nelson, David, Huynh, Kevin, Gainer, Alesia, Alavi, Seyed Hossein, Yahata, Rhys, Leuski, Anton, Yanov, Volodymyr and Traum, David
Abstract:
This study explores two hypotheses about human-agent teaming: 1. Real-time coordination among a large set of autonomous robots can be achieved using predefined “plays” which define how to execute a task, and “audibles” which modify the play on the fly; 2. A spokesperson agent can serve as a representative for a group of robots, relaying information between the robots and human teammates. These hypotheses are tested in a simulated game environment: a human participant leads a search-and-rescue operation to evacuate a town threatened by an approaching wildfire, with the object of saving as many lives as possible. The participant communicates verbally with a virtual agent controlling a team of ten aerial robots and one ground vehicle, while observing a live map display with real-time location of the fire and identified survivors. Since full automation is not currently possible, two human controllers control the agent’s speech and actions, and input parameters to the robots, which then operate autonomously until the parameters are changed. Designated plays include monitoring the spread of fire, searching for survivors, broadcasting warnings, guiding residents to safety, and sending the rescue vehicle. A successful evacuation of all the residents requires personal intervention in some cases (e.g., stubborn residents) while delegating other responsibilities to the spokesperson agent and robots, all in a rapidly changing scene. The study records the participants’ verbal and nonverbal behavior in order to identify strategies people use when communicating with robotic swarms, and to collect data for eventual automation.
Reference:
Human swarm interaction using plays, audibles, and a virtual spokesperson (Chaffey, Patricia, Artstein, Ron, Georgila, Kallirroi, Pollard, Kimberly A., Nasihati Gilani, Setareh, Krum, David M., Nelson, David, Huynh, Kevin, Gainer, Alesia, Alavi, Seyed Hossein, Yahata, Rhys, Leuski, Anton, Yanov, Volodymyr and Traum, David), In Proceedings of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning for Multi-Domain Operations Applications II, SPIE, 2020.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{chaffey_human_2020,
	address = {Online Only, United States},
	title = {Human swarm interaction using plays, audibles, and a virtual spokesperson},
	isbn = {978-1-5106-3603-3 978-1-5106-3604-0},
	url = {https://www.spiedigitallibrary.org/conference-proceedings-of-spie/11413/2557573/Human-swarm-interaction-using-plays-audibles-and-a-virtual-spokesperson/10.1117/12.2557573.full},
	doi = {10.1117/12.2557573},
	abstract = {This study explores two hypotheses about human-agent teaming: 1. Real-time coordination among a large set of autonomous robots can be achieved using predefined “plays” which define how to execute a task, and “audibles” which modify the play on the fly; 2. A spokesperson agent can serve as a representative for a group of robots, relaying information between the robots and human teammates. These hypotheses are tested in a simulated game environment: a human participant leads a search-and-rescue operation to evacuate a town threatened by an approaching wildfire, with the object of saving as many lives as possible. The participant communicates verbally with a virtual agent controlling a team of ten aerial robots and one ground vehicle, while observing a live map display with real-time location of the fire and identified survivors. Since full automation is not currently possible, two human controllers control the agent’s speech and actions, and input parameters to the robots, which then operate autonomously until the parameters are changed. Designated plays include monitoring the spread of fire, searching for survivors, broadcasting warnings, guiding residents to safety, and sending the rescue vehicle. A successful evacuation of all the residents requires personal intervention in some cases (e.g., stubborn residents) while delegating other responsibilities to the spokesperson agent and robots, all in a rapidly changing scene. The study records the participants’ verbal and nonverbal behavior in order to identify strategies people use when communicating with robotic swarms, and to collect data for eventual automation.},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of {Artificial} {Intelligence} and {Machine} {Learning} for {Multi}-{Domain} {Operations} {Applications} {II}},
	publisher = {SPIE},
	author = {Chaffey, Patricia and Artstein, Ron and Georgila, Kallirroi and Pollard, Kimberly A. and Nasihati Gilani, Setareh and Krum, David M. and Nelson, David and Huynh, Kevin and Gainer, Alesia and Alavi, Seyed Hossein and Yahata, Rhys and Leuski, Anton and Yanov, Volodymyr and Traum, David},
	month = apr,
	year = {2020},
	keywords = {ARL, DoD, MxR, UARC, Virtual Humans},
	pages = {40}
}
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