Why Assess? The Role of Assessment in Learning Science and Society (bibtex)
by Benjamin D. Nye and Piotr Mitros, Christian Schunn and Peter W. Foltz and Dragan Gasevic and Irvin R. Katz
Abstract:
Even though assessment often is imperfect, it provides valuable input to the process of teaching, learning, and educational resource design. However, narrow assessment, especially used in high-stakes settings, can lead to worse educational outcomes (e.g., performance in later courses, workplace, or social settings; Hout & Elliott, 2011). Teachers may have a strong incentive to teach to the test, leading to a strong focus on memorization and rote procedural knowledge, while compromising key skills such as empathy, groupwork, mathematical maturity, and analytical reasoning. These are thorny problems – education shapes the skills1 that shape society, so these questions have broad implications. With that said, by constraining the discussion to the kinds of constructs considered when building learning experiences, the goals of assessment become more tractable.
Reference:
Why Assess? The Role of Assessment in Learning Science and Society (Benjamin D. Nye and Piotr Mitros, Christian Schunn and Peter W. Foltz and Dragan Gasevic and Irvin R. Katz), Chapter in Design Recommendations for Intelligent Tutoring Systems: Volume 5- Assessment, US Army Research Laboratory, volume 5, 2017.
Bibtex Entry:
@incollection{benjamin_d._nye_why_2017,
	address = {Orlando, FL},
	title = {Why {Assess}? {The} {Role} of {Assessment} in {Learning} {Science} and {Society}},
	volume = {5},
	isbn = {978-0-9977257-2-8},
	url = {https://books.google.com/books?id=5tsyDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA189&source=gbs_toc_r&cad=4#v=onepage&q&f=false},
	abstract = {Even though assessment often is imperfect, it provides valuable input to the process of teaching, learning, and educational resource design. However, narrow assessment, especially used in high-stakes settings, can lead to worse educational outcomes (e.g., performance in later courses, workplace, or social settings; Hout \& Elliott, 2011). Teachers may have a strong incentive to teach to the test, leading to a strong focus on memorization and rote procedural knowledge, while compromising key skills such as empathy, groupwork, mathematical maturity, and analytical reasoning. These are thorny problems – education shapes the skills1 that shape society, so these questions have broad implications. With that said, by constraining the discussion to the kinds of constructs considered when building learning experiences, the goals of assessment become more tractable.},
	booktitle = {Design {Recommendations} for {Intelligent} {Tutoring} {Systems}: {Volume} 5- {Assessment}},
	publisher = {US Army Research Laboratory},
	author = {{Benjamin D. Nye} and {Piotr Mitros} and {Christian Schunn} and {Peter W. Foltz} and {Dragan Gasevic} and {Irvin R. Katz}},
	month = aug,
	year = {2017},
	keywords = {Learning Sciences, UARC},
	pages = {189--202}
}
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