Rapport Building with Social Robots as a Method for Improving Mission Debriefing in Human-Robot Teams (bibtex)
by Bellas, Alexandria, Perrin, Stefawn, Malone, Brandon, Rogers, Kaytlin, Lucas, Gale, Phillips, Elizabeth, Tossell, Chad and Visser, Ewart de
Abstract:
Conflicts may arise at any time during military debriefing meetings, especially in high intensity deployed settings. When such conflicts arise, it takes time to get everyone back into a receptive state of mind so that they engage in reflective discussion rather than unproductive arguing. It has been proposed by some that the use of social robots equipped with social abilities such as emotion regulation through rapport building may help to deescalate these situations to facilitate critical operational decisions. However, in military settings, the same AI agent used in the pre-brief of a mission may not be the same one used in the debrief. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a brief rapport-building session with a social robot could create a connection between a human and a robot agent, and whether consistency in the embodiment of the robot agent was necessary for maintaining this connection once formed. We report the results of a pilot study conducted at the United States Air Force Academy which simulated a military mission (i.e., Gravity and Strike). Participants’ connection with the agent, sense of trust, and overall likeability revealed that early rapport building can be beneficial for military missions.
Reference:
Rapport Building with Social Robots as a Method for Improving Mission Debriefing in Human-Robot Teams (Bellas, Alexandria, Perrin, Stefawn, Malone, Brandon, Rogers, Kaytlin, Lucas, Gale, Phillips, Elizabeth, Tossell, Chad and Visser, Ewart de), In Proceedings of the 2020 Systems and Information Engineering Design Symposium (SIEDS), IEEE, 2020.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{bellas_rapport_2020,
	address = {Charlottesville, VA, USA},
	title = {Rapport {Building} with {Social} {Robots} as a {Method} for {Improving} {Mission} {Debriefing} in {Human}-{Robot} {Teams}},
	isbn = {978-1-72817-145-6},
	url = {https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/9106643/},
	doi = {10.1109/SIEDS49339.2020.9106643},
	abstract = {Conflicts may arise at any time during military debriefing meetings, especially in high intensity deployed settings. When such conflicts arise, it takes time to get everyone back into a receptive state of mind so that they engage in reflective discussion rather than unproductive arguing. It has been proposed by some that the use of social robots equipped with social abilities such as emotion regulation through rapport building may help to deescalate these situations to facilitate critical operational decisions. However, in military settings, the same AI agent used in the pre-brief of a mission may not be the same one used in the debrief. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a brief rapport-building session with a social robot could create a connection between a human and a robot agent, and whether consistency in the embodiment of the robot agent was necessary for maintaining this connection once formed. We report the results of a pilot study conducted at the United States Air Force Academy which simulated a military mission (i.e., Gravity and Strike). Participants’ connection with the agent, sense of trust, and overall likeability revealed that early rapport building can be beneficial for military missions.},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of the 2020 {Systems} and {Information} {Engineering} {Design} {Symposium} ({SIEDS})},
	publisher = {IEEE},
	author = {Bellas, Alexandria and Perrin, Stefawn and Malone, Brandon and Rogers, Kaytlin and Lucas, Gale and Phillips, Elizabeth and Tossell, Chad and Visser, Ewart de},
	month = apr,
	year = {2020},
	keywords = {ARO-Coop, Virtual Humans},
	pages = {160--163}
}
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