Clinical Virtual Reality: Emerging Opportunities for Psychiatry (bibtex)
by Albert "Skip" Rizzo, Sebastian Thomas Koenig, Thomas B Talbot
Abstract:
Virtual reality (VR) technology offers new opportunities for the development of innovative clinical research, assessment, and intervention tools. VR-based testing, training, teaching, and treatment approaches that would be difficult, if not impossible, to deliver with traditional methods are now being developed that take advantage of the assets that are available with VR technology. As research evidence continues to indicate clinical efficacy, VR applications are being increasingly regarded as providing innovative options for targeting the cognitive, psychological, motor, and functional impairments that result from various clinical health conditions. VR allows for the precise presentation and control of stimuli in dynamic, multisensory, 3D computer-generated simulations as well as providing advanced methods for capturing and quantifying behavioral responses. These characteristics support the rationale for the use of VR applications in clinical assessment, intervention, and training. This article begins with a brief review of the history of and rationale for the use of VR with clinical populations. It then details one use case for the clinical application of VR—the exposure-therapy treatment of anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder. Although significant work is cited in other areas of clinical VR (e.g., pain management, cognitive and physical assessment and rehabilitation, eating disorders, social skills, and clinical training), a full overview of such a broad literature is beyond the scope of this article. Thus, the authors have opted to provide more in-depth analysis of one specific clinical area that clearly illustrates how VR has been successfully applied and is supported by an encouraging and evolving scientific literature.
Reference:
Clinical Virtual Reality: Emerging Opportunities for Psychiatry (Albert "Skip" Rizzo, Sebastian Thomas Koenig, Thomas B Talbot), In Focus: The Journal of Lifelong Learning in Psychiatry, 2018.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{rizzo_clinical_2018-1,
	title = {Clinical {Virtual} {Reality}: {Emerging} {Opportunities} for {Psychiatry}},
	url = {https://focus.psychiatryonline.org/doi/abs/10.1176/appi.focus.20180011},
	abstract = {Virtual reality (VR) technology offers new opportunities for the development of innovative clinical research, assessment, and intervention tools. VR-based testing, training, teaching, and treatment approaches that would be difficult, if not impossible, to deliver with traditional methods are now being developed that take advantage of the assets that are available with VR technology. As research evidence continues to indicate clinical efficacy, VR applications are being increasingly regarded as providing innovative options for targeting the cognitive, psychological, motor, and functional impairments that result from various clinical health conditions. VR allows for the precise presentation and control of stimuli in dynamic, multisensory, 3D computer-generated simulations as well as providing advanced methods for capturing and quantifying behavioral responses. These characteristics support the rationale for the use of VR applications in clinical assessment, intervention, and training. This article begins with a brief review of the history of and rationale for the use of VR with clinical populations. It then details one use case for the clinical application of VR—the exposure-therapy treatment of anxiety disorders and posttraumatic stress disorder. Although significant work is cited in other areas of clinical VR (e.g., pain management, cognitive and physical assessment and rehabilitation, eating disorders, social skills, and clinical training), a full overview of such a broad literature is beyond the scope of this article. Thus, the authors have opted to provide more in-depth analysis of one specific clinical area that clearly illustrates how VR has been successfully applied and is supported by an encouraging and evolving scientific literature.},
	journal = {Focus: The Journal of Lifelong Learning in Psychiatry},
	author = {Rizzo, Albert "Skip" and Koenig, Sebastian Thomas and Talbot, Thomas B},
	month = jul,
	year = {2018},
	keywords = {MedVR}
}
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