An Incremental Response Policy in an Automatic Word-Game (bibtex)
by Eli Pincus, David Traum
Abstract:
Turn-taking is an important aspect of human-human and human-computer interaction. Rapid turn-taking is a feature of human-human interaction that is difficult for today’s dialogue systems to emulate. For example, typical humanhuman interactions can involve an original sending interlocutor changing or stopping their speech mid-utterance as a result of overlapping speech from the other interlocutor. The overlapping utterances from the other interlocutor are typically called barge-in utterances. An example of this phenomena is seen in the two turns of dialogue in the top half of Figure 1. In this dialogue segment Student A first reveals his test score in the original utterance. Student A then begins to tell student B that he had heard Student B got a perfect score. Student B interrupts Student A with a barge-in utterance that contains new information (that actually he had not performed well on the test) causing Student A to halt his speech and not finish his original utterance. We call the unspoken part of student A’s original utterance Student A’s originally intended utterance. Student A then makes a decision based on the new information to not say his originally intended utterance. This is likely due to the originally intended utterance no longer being appropriate considering the new information made available to Student A. Student A then makes an intelligent next choice of what to say which can be seen in Student A’s updated utterance which takes into account the new information contained in Student B’s barge-in utterance. In this work we refer to Student A’s dialogue move as an intelligent update.
Reference:
An Incremental Response Policy in an Automatic Word-Game (Eli Pincus, David Traum), In Proceedings of IVA 2017 Workshop on Conversational Interruptions in Human-Agent Interactions, 2017.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{pincus_incremental_2017,
	address = {Stockholm, Sweden},
	title = {An {Incremental} {Response} {Policy} in an {Automatic} {Word}-{Game}},
	url = {http://people.ict.usc.edu/~traum/Papers/pincus_traum-cihai2017.pdf},
	abstract = {Turn-taking is an important aspect of human-human and human-computer interaction. Rapid turn-taking is a feature of human-human interaction that is difficult for today’s dialogue systems to emulate. For example, typical humanhuman interactions can involve an original sending interlocutor changing or stopping their speech mid-utterance as a result of overlapping speech from the other interlocutor. The overlapping utterances from the other interlocutor are typically called barge-in utterances. An example of this phenomena is seen in the two turns of dialogue in the top half of Figure 1. In this dialogue segment Student A first reveals his test score in the original utterance. Student A then begins to tell student B that he had heard Student B got a perfect score. Student B interrupts Student A with a barge-in utterance that contains new information (that actually he had not performed well on the test) causing Student A to halt his speech and not finish his original utterance. We call the unspoken part of student A’s original utterance Student A’s originally intended utterance. Student A then makes a decision based on the new information to not say his originally intended utterance. This is likely due to the originally intended utterance no longer being appropriate considering the new information made available to Student A. Student A then makes an intelligent next choice of what to say which can be seen in Student A’s updated utterance which takes into account the new information contained in Student B’s barge-in utterance. In this work we refer to Student A’s dialogue move as an intelligent update.},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of {IVA} 2017 {Workshop} on {Conversational} {Interruptions} in {Human}-{Agent} {Interactions}},
	author = {Pincus, Eli and Traum, David},
	month = aug,
	year = {2017},
	keywords = {UARC, Virtual Humans}
}
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