Virtual reality exposure versus prolonged exposure for PTSD: Which treatment for whom? (bibtex)
by Aaron M. Norr, Derek J. Smolenski, Andrea C. Katz, Albert A. Rizzo, Barbara O. Rothbaum, JoAnn Difede, Patricia Koenen-Woods, Mark A. Reger, Greg M. Reger
Abstract:
1 Background The majority of studies comparing active psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) do not find significant differences at posttreatment. This was the case in a recent trial examining prolonged exposure (PE) and virtual reality exposure (VRE) among active‐duty soldiers with combat‐related PTSD. Matching individual patients to specific treatments provides a potential avenue to improve significantly the public health impact of effective treatments for PTSD. A composite moderator approach was used to identify profiles of patients who would see superior PTSD symptom reduction in VRE or PE to inform future treatment matching. 2 Methods Active duty U.S. army soldiers (N = 108) were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial comparing VRE and PE in the treatment of PTSD stemming from deployments to Iraq or Afghanistan. Eighteen baseline variables were examined to identify treatment response heterogeneity in two patient groups: those with a superior response to PE and those with a superior response to VRE. The final composite moderator comprised four of 18 baseline variables. 3 Results Results revealed that patients who were predicted to see greater PTSD symptom reduction in VRE were likely to be younger, not taking antidepressant medication, had greater PTSD hyperarousal symptoms, and were more likely to have greater than minimal suicide risk. 4 Conclusions Results suggest that treatment matching based on patient profiles could meaningfully improve treatment efficacy for combat‐related PTSD. Future research can build on these results to improve our understanding of how to improve treatment matching for PTSD.
Reference:
Virtual reality exposure versus prolonged exposure for PTSD: Which treatment for whom? (Aaron M. Norr, Derek J. Smolenski, Andrea C. Katz, Albert A. Rizzo, Barbara O. Rothbaum, JoAnn Difede, Patricia Koenen-Woods, Mark A. Reger, Greg M. Reger), In Depression and Anxiety, volume 35, 2018.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{norr_virtual_2018,
	title = {Virtual reality exposure versus prolonged exposure for {PTSD}: {Which} treatment for whom?},
	volume = {35},
	issn = {10914269},
	url = {http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/da.22751},
	doi = {10.1002/da.22751},
	abstract = {1 Background
The majority of studies comparing active psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) do not find significant differences at posttreatment. This was the case in a recent trial examining prolonged exposure (PE) and virtual reality exposure (VRE) among active‐duty soldiers with combat‐related PTSD. Matching individual patients to specific treatments provides a potential avenue to improve significantly the public health impact of effective treatments for PTSD. A composite moderator approach was used to identify profiles of patients who would see superior PTSD symptom reduction in VRE or PE to inform future treatment matching.

2 Methods
Active duty U.S. army soldiers (N = 108) were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial comparing VRE and PE in the treatment of PTSD stemming from deployments to Iraq or Afghanistan. Eighteen baseline variables were examined to identify treatment response heterogeneity in two patient groups: those with a superior response to PE and those with a superior response to VRE. The final composite moderator comprised four of 18 baseline variables.

3 Results
Results revealed that patients who were predicted to see greater PTSD symptom reduction in VRE were likely to be younger, not taking antidepressant medication, had greater PTSD hyperarousal symptoms, and were more likely to have greater than minimal suicide risk.

4 Conclusions
Results suggest that treatment matching based on patient profiles could meaningfully improve treatment efficacy for combat‐related PTSD. Future research can build on these results to improve our understanding of how to improve treatment matching for PTSD.},
	number = {6},
	journal = {Depression and Anxiety},
	author = {Norr, Aaron M. and Smolenski, Derek J. and Katz, Andrea C. and Rizzo, Albert A. and Rothbaum, Barbara O. and Difede, JoAnn and Koenen-Woods, Patricia and Reger, Mark A. and Reger, Greg M.},
	month = jun,
	year = {2018},
	keywords = {MedVR},
	pages = {523--529}
}
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