Autonomous Agent that Provides Automated Feedback Improves Negotiation Skills (bibtex)
by Shannon Monahan, Emmanuel Johnson, Gale Lucas, James Finch, Jonathan Gratch
Abstract:
Research has found that individuals can improve their negotiation abilities by practicing with virtual agents [1, 2]. For these pedagogical agents to become more “intelligent,” the system should be able to give feedback on negotiation performance [3, 4]. In this study, we examined the impact of providing such individualized feedback. Participants first engaged in a negotiation with a virtual agent. After this negotiation, participants were either given automated individualized feedback or not. Feedback was based on negotiation principles [4], which were quantified using a validated approach [5]. Participants then completed a second, parallel negotiation. Our results show that, compared to the control condition, participants who received such feedback after the first negotiation showed a significantly greater improvement in the strength of their first offer, concession curve, and thus their final outcome in the negotiation.
Reference:
Autonomous Agent that Provides Automated Feedback Improves Negotiation Skills (Shannon Monahan, Emmanuel Johnson, Gale Lucas, James Finch, Jonathan Gratch), Chapter in Artificial Intelligence in Education, Springer International Publishing, volume 10948, 2018.
Bibtex Entry:
@incollection{monahan_autonomous_2018,
	address = {Cham, Switzerland},
	title = {Autonomous {Agent} that {Provides} {Automated} {Feedback} {Improves} {Negotiation} {Skills}},
	volume = {10948},
	isbn = {978-3-319-93845-5 978-3-319-93846-2},
	url = {http://link.springer.com/10.1007/978-3-319-93846-2_41},
	abstract = {Research has found that individuals can improve their negotiation abilities by practicing with virtual agents [1, 2]. For these pedagogical agents to become more “intelligent,” the system should be able to give feedback on negotiation performance [3, 4]. In this study, we examined the impact of providing such individualized feedback. Participants first engaged in a negotiation with a virtual agent. After this negotiation, participants were either given automated individualized feedback or not. Feedback was based on negotiation principles [4], which were quantified using a validated approach [5]. Participants then completed a second, parallel negotiation. Our results show that, compared to the control condition, participants who received such feedback after the first negotiation showed a significantly greater improvement in the strength of their first offer, concession curve, and thus their final outcome in the negotiation.},
	booktitle = {Artificial {Intelligence} in {Education}},
	publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
	author = {Monahan, Shannon and Johnson, Emmanuel and Lucas, Gale and Finch, James and Gratch, Jonathan},
	month = jun,
	year = {2018},
	doi = {10.1007/978-3-319-93846-2_41},
	keywords = {UARC, Virtual Humans},
	pages = {225--229}
}
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