It’s only a computer: Virtual humans increase willingness to disclose (bibtex)
by Gale M. Lucas, Jonathan Gratch, Aisha King, Louis-Philippe Morency
Abstract:
Research has begun to explore the use of virtual humans (VHs) in clinical interviews (Bickmore, Gruber, & Picard, 2005). When designed as supportive and ‘‘safe’’ interaction partners, VHs may improve such screenings by increasing willingness to disclose information (Gratch, Wang, Gerten, & Fast, 2007). In health and mental health contexts, patients are often reluctant to respond honestly. In the context of health-screening interviews, we report a study in which participants interacted with a VH interviewer and were led to believe that the VH was controlled by either humans or automation. As predicted, compared to those who believed they were interacting with a human operator, participants who believed they were interacting with a computer reported lower fear of self-disclosure, lower impression management, displayed their sadness more intensely, and were rated by observers as more willing to disclose. These results suggest that automated VHs can help overcome a significant barrier to obtaining truthful patient information.
Reference:
It’s only a computer: Virtual humans increase willingness to disclose (Gale M. Lucas, Jonathan Gratch, Aisha King, Louis-Philippe Morency), In Computers in Human Behavior, volume 37, 2014.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{lucas_its_2014,
	title = {It’s only a computer: {Virtual} humans increase willingness to disclose},
	volume = {37},
	issn = {07475632},
	shorttitle = {It’s only a computer},
	url = {http://ict.usc.edu/pubs/It%27s%20Only%20a%20Computer%20-%20Virtual%20Humans%20Increase%20Willingness%20to%20Disclose.pdf},
	doi = {10.1016/j.chb.2014.04.043},
	abstract = {Research has begun to explore the use of virtual humans (VHs) in clinical interviews (Bickmore, Gruber, \& Picard, 2005). When designed as supportive and ‘‘safe’’ interaction partners, VHs may improve such screenings by increasing willingness to disclose information (Gratch, Wang, Gerten, \& Fast, 2007). In health and mental health contexts, patients are often reluctant to respond honestly. In the context of health-screening interviews, we report a study in which participants interacted with a VH interviewer and were led to believe that the VH was controlled by either humans or automation. As predicted, compared to those who believed they were interacting with a human operator, participants who believed they were interacting with a computer reported lower fear of self-disclosure, lower impression management, displayed their sadness more intensely, and were rated by observers as more willing to disclose. These results suggest that automated VHs can help overcome a significant barrier to obtaining truthful patient information.},
	language = {en},
	journal = {Computers in Human Behavior},
	author = {Lucas, Gale M. and Gratch, Jonathan and King, Aisha and Morency, Louis-Philippe},
	month = aug,
	year = {2014},
	keywords = {Virtual Humans, UARC},
	pages = {94--100}
}
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