The effect of operating a virtual doppleganger in a 3D simulation (bibtex)
by Gale Lucas, Evan Szablowski, Jonathan Gratch, Andrew Feng, Tiffany Huang, Jill Boberg, Ari Shapiro
Abstract:
Recent advances in scanning technology have enabled the widespread capture of 3D character models based on human subjects. Intuition suggests that, with these new capabilities to create avatars that look like their users, every player should have his or her own avatar to play video games or simulations. We explicitly test the impact of having one’s own avatar (vs. a yoked control avatar) in a simulation (i.e., maze running task with mines). We test the impact of avatar identity on both subjective (e.g., feeling connected and engaged, liking avatar’s appearance, feeling upset when avatar’s injured, enjoying the game) and behavioral variables (e.g., time to complete task, speed, number of mines triggered, riskiness of maze path chosen). Results indicate that having an avatar that looks like the user improves their subjective experience, but there is no significant effect on how users perform in the simulation.
Reference:
The effect of operating a virtual doppleganger in a 3D simulation (Gale Lucas, Evan Szablowski, Jonathan Gratch, Andrew Feng, Tiffany Huang, Jill Boberg, Ari Shapiro), In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Motion in Games, ACM Press, 2016.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{lucas_effect_2016,
	address = {Burlingame, CA},
	title = {The effect of operating a virtual doppleganger in a 3D simulation},
	isbn = {978-1-4503-4592-7},
	url = {http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2994258.2994263},
	doi = {10.1145/2994258.2994263},
	abstract = {Recent advances in scanning technology have enabled the widespread capture of 3D character models based on human subjects. Intuition suggests that, with these new capabilities to create avatars that look like their users, every player should have his or her own avatar to play video games or simulations. We explicitly test the impact of having one’s own avatar (vs. a yoked control avatar) in a simulation (i.e., maze running task with mines). We test the impact of avatar identity on both subjective (e.g., feeling connected and engaged, liking avatar’s appearance, feeling upset when avatar’s injured, enjoying the game) and behavioral variables (e.g., time to complete task, speed, number of mines triggered, riskiness of maze path chosen). Results indicate that having an avatar that looks like the user improves their subjective experience, but there is no significant effect on how users perform in the simulation.},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of the 9th {International} {Conference} on {Motion} in {Games}},
	publisher = {ACM Press},
	author = {Lucas, Gale and Szablowski, Evan and Gratch, Jonathan and Feng, Andrew and Huang, Tiffany and Boberg, Jill and Shapiro, Ari},
	month = oct,
	year = {2016},
	keywords = {Virtual Humans},
	pages = {167--174}
}
Powered by bibtexbrowser