Culture, Errors, and Rapport-building Dialogue in Social Agents (bibtex)
by Gale M Lucas, Jill Boberg, David Traum, Ron Artstein, Jonathan Gratch, Alesia Gainer, Emmanuel Johnson, Anton Leuski, Mikio Nakano
Abstract:
This work explores whether culture impacts the extent to which social dialogue can mitigate (or exacerbate) the loss of trust caused when agents make conversational errors. Our study uses an agent designed to persuade users to agree with its rankings on two tasks. Participants from the U.S. and Japan completed our study. We perform two manipulations: (1) The presence of conversational errors – the agent exhibited errors in the second task or not; (2) The presence of social dialogue – between the two tasks, users either engaged in a social dialogue with the agent or completed a control task. Replicating previous research, conversational errors reduce the agent’s influence. However, we found that culture matters: there was a marginally significant three-way interaction with culture, presence of social dialogue, and presence of errors. The pattern of results suggests that, for American participants, social dialogue backfired if it is followed by errors, presumably because it extends the period of good performance, creating a stronger contrast effect with the subsequent errors. However, for Japanese participants, social dialogue if anything mitigates the detrimental effect of errors; the negative effect of errors is only seen in the absence of a social dialogue. Agent design should therefore take the culture of the intended users into consideration when considering use of social dialogue to bolster agents against conversational errors.
Reference:
Culture, Errors, and Rapport-building Dialogue in Social Agents (Gale M Lucas, Jill Boberg, David Traum, Ron Artstein, Jonathan Gratch, Alesia Gainer, Emmanuel Johnson, Anton Leuski, Mikio Nakano), In Proceedings of the 18th International Conference on Intelligent Virtual Agents, ACM, 2018.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{lucas_culture_2018,
	address = {Sydney, Australia},
	title = {Culture, {Errors}, and {Rapport}-building {Dialogue} in {Social} {Agents}},
	isbn = {978-1-4503-6013-5},
	url = {https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=3267887},
	doi = {10.1145/3267851.3267887},
	abstract = {This work explores whether culture impacts the extent to which social dialogue can mitigate (or exacerbate) the loss of trust caused when agents make conversational errors. Our study uses an agent designed to persuade users to agree with its rankings on two tasks. Participants from the U.S. and Japan completed our study. We perform two manipulations: (1) The presence of conversational errors – the agent exhibited errors in the second task or not; (2) The presence of social dialogue – between the two tasks, users either engaged in a social dialogue with the agent or completed a control task. Replicating previous research, conversational errors reduce the agent’s influence. However, we found that culture matters: there was a marginally significant three-way interaction with culture, presence of social dialogue, and presence of errors. The pattern of results suggests that, for American participants, social dialogue backfired if it is followed by errors, presumably because it extends the period of good performance, creating a stronger contrast effect with the subsequent errors. However, for Japanese participants, social dialogue if anything mitigates the detrimental effect of errors; the negative effect of errors is only seen in the absence of a social dialogue. Agent design should therefore take the culture of the intended users into consideration when considering use of social dialogue to bolster agents against conversational errors.},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of the 18th {International} {Conference} on {Intelligent} {Virtual} {Agents}},
	publisher = {ACM},
	author = {Lucas, Gale M and Boberg, Jill and Traum, David and Artstein, Ron and Gratch, Jonathan and Gainer, Alesia and Johnson, Emmanuel and Leuski, Anton and Nakano, Mikio},
	month = nov,
	year = {2018},
	keywords = {Virtual Humans, UARC},
	pages = {51--58}
}
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