Social Impact of Enhanced Gaze Presentation Using Head Mounted Projection (bibtex)
by David M. Krum, Sin-Hwa Kang, Thai Phan, Lauren Cairco Dukes, Mark Bolas
Abstract:
Projected displays can present life-sized imagery of a virtual human character that can be seen by multiple observers. However, typical projected displays can only render that virtual human from a single viewpoint, regardless of whether head tracking is employed. This results in the virtual human being rendered from an incorrect perspective for most individuals in a group of observers. This could result in perceptual miscues, such as the “Mona Lisa” effect, causing the virtual human to appear as if it is simultaneously gazing and pointing at all observers in the room regardless of their location. This may be detrimental to training scenarios in which all trainees must accurately assess where the virtual human is looking or pointing a weapon. In this paper, we discuss our investigations into the presentation of eye gaze using REFLCT, a previously introduced head mounted projective display. REFLCT uses head tracked, head mounted projectors and retroreflective screens to present personalized, perspective correct imagery to multiple users without the occlusion of a traditional head mounted display. We examined how head mounted projection for enhanced presentation of eye gaze might facilitate or otherwise affect social interactions during a multi-person guessing game of “Twenty Questions.”
Reference:
Social Impact of Enhanced Gaze Presentation Using Head Mounted Projection (David M. Krum, Sin-Hwa Kang, Thai Phan, Lauren Cairco Dukes, Mark Bolas), In Proceedings of the Human-Computer Interaction International Conference, Springer International Publishing, 2017.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{krum_social_2017,
	address = {Vancouver, Canada},
	title = {Social {Impact} of {Enhanced} {Gaze} {Presentation} {Using} {Head} {Mounted} {Projection}},
	isbn = {978-3-319-58696-0 978-3-319-58697-7},
	url = {https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-58697-7_5},
	abstract = {Projected displays can present life-sized imagery of a virtual human character that can be seen by multiple observers. However, typical projected displays can only render that virtual human from a single viewpoint, regardless of whether head tracking is employed. This results in the virtual human being rendered from an incorrect perspective for most individuals in a group of observers. This could result in perceptual miscues, such as the “Mona Lisa” effect, causing the virtual human to appear as if it is simultaneously gazing and pointing at all observers in the room regardless of their location. This may be detrimental to training scenarios in which all trainees must accurately assess where the virtual human is looking or pointing a weapon. In this paper, we discuss our investigations into the presentation of eye gaze using REFLCT, a previously introduced head mounted projective display. REFLCT uses head tracked, head mounted projectors and retroreflective screens to present personalized, perspective correct imagery to multiple users without the occlusion of a traditional head mounted display. We examined how head mounted projection for enhanced presentation of eye gaze might facilitate or otherwise affect social interactions during a multi-person guessing game of “Twenty Questions.”},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of the {Human}-{Computer} {Interaction} {International} {Conference}},
	publisher = {Springer International Publishing},
	author = {Krum, David M. and Kang, Sin-Hwa and Phan, Thai and Dukes, Lauren Cairco and Bolas, Mark},
	month = may,
	year = {2017},
	keywords = {MedVR, MxR, UARC}
}
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