Social Snacking with a virtual agent – On the interrelation of need to belong and effects of social responsiveness when interacting with artificial entities (bibtex)
by Nicole C. Krämer, Gale Lucas, Lea Schmitt, Jonathan Gratch
Abstract:
Based on considerations that people´s need to belong can be temporarily satisfied by “social snacking” (Gardner et al., 2005) in the sense that in absence of social interactions which adequately satisfy belongingness needs surrogates can bridge lonely times, it was tested whether the interaction with a virtual agent can serve to ease the need for social contact. In a between subjects experimental setting, 79 participants interacted with a virtual agent who either displayed socially responsive nonverbal behavior or not. Results demonstrate that although there was no main effect of socially responsive behavior on participants´ subjective experience of rapport and on connectedness with the agent, those people with a high need to belong reported less willingness to engage in social activities after the interaction with a virtual agent – but only if the agent displayed socially responsive behavior.
Reference:
Social Snacking with a virtual agent – On the interrelation of need to belong and effects of social responsiveness when interacting with artificial entities (Nicole C. Krämer, Gale Lucas, Lea Schmitt, Jonathan Gratch), In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 2017.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{kramer_social_2017,
	title = {Social {Snacking} with a virtual agent – {On} the interrelation of need to belong and effects of social responsiveness when interacting with artificial entities},
	issn = {10715819},
	url = {http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1071581917301271},
	doi = {10.1016/j.ijhcs.2017.09.001},
	abstract = {Based on considerations that people´s need to belong can be temporarily satisfied by “social snacking” (Gardner et al., 2005) in the sense that in absence of social interactions which adequately satisfy belongingness needs surrogates can bridge lonely times, it was tested whether the interaction with a virtual agent can serve to ease the need for social contact. In a between subjects experimental setting, 79 participants interacted with a virtual agent who either displayed socially responsive nonverbal behavior or not. Results demonstrate that although there was no main effect of socially responsive behavior on participants´ subjective experience of rapport and on connectedness with the agent, those people with a high need to belong reported less willingness to engage in social activities after the interaction with a virtual agent – but only if the agent displayed socially responsive behavior.},
	journal = {International Journal of Human-Computer Studies},
	author = {Krämer, Nicole C. and Lucas, Gale and Schmitt, Lea and Gratch, Jonathan},
	month = sep,
	year = {2017},
	keywords = {Virtual Humans}
}
Powered by bibtexbrowser