Vertical Field-of-View Extension and Walking Characteristics in Head-Worn Virtual Environments (bibtex)
by J. Adam Jones, David M. Krum, Mark T. Bolas
Abstract:
In this article, we detail a series of experiments that examines the effect of vertical field-of-view extension and the addition of non-specific peripheral visual stimulation on gait characteristics and distance judgments in a head-worn virtual environment. Specifically, we examined four field-of-view configurations: a common 60° diagonal field of view (48° × 40°), a 60° diagonal field of view with the addition of a luminous white frame in the far periphery, a field of view with an extended upper edge, and a field of view with an extended lower edge. We found that extension of the field of view, either with spatially congruent or spatially non-informative visuals, resulted in improved distance judgments and changes in observed posture. However, these effects were not equal across all field-of-view configurations, suggesting that some configurations may be more appropriate than others when balancing performance, cost, and ergonomics.
Reference:
Vertical Field-of-View Extension and Walking Characteristics in Head-Worn Virtual Environments (J. Adam Jones, David M. Krum, Mark T. Bolas), In ACM Transactions on Applied Perception, volume 14, 2016.
Bibtex Entry:
@article{jones_vertical_2016,
	title = {Vertical {Field}-of-{View} {Extension} and {Walking} {Characteristics} in {Head}-{Worn} {Virtual} {Environments}},
	volume = {14},
	issn = {15443558},
	url = {http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2983631},
	doi = {10.1145/2983631},
	abstract = {In this article, we detail a series of experiments that examines the effect of vertical field-of-view extension and the addition of non-specific peripheral visual stimulation on gait characteristics and distance judgments in a head-worn virtual environment. Specifically, we examined four field-of-view configurations: a common 60° diagonal field of view (48° × 40°), a 60° diagonal field of view with the addition of a luminous white frame in the far periphery, a field of view with an extended upper edge, and a field of view with an extended lower edge. We found that extension of the field of view, either with spatially congruent or spatially non-informative visuals, resulted in improved distance judgments and changes in observed posture. However, these effects were not equal across all field-of-view configurations, suggesting that some configurations may be more appropriate than others when balancing performance, cost, and ergonomics.},
	number = {2},
	journal = {ACM Transactions on Applied Perception},
	author = {Jones, J. Adam and Krum, David M. and Bolas, Mark T.},
	month = oct,
	year = {2016},
	keywords = {MxR},
	pages = {1--17}
}
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