Niki and Julie: A Robot and Virtual Human for Studying Multimodal Social Interaction (bibtex)
by Ron Artstein, David Traum, Jill Boberg, Alesia Gainer, Jonathan Gratch, Emmanuel Johnson, Anton Leuski, Mikio Nakano
Abstract:
We demonstrate two agents, a robot and a virtual human, which can be used for studying factors that impact social influence. The agents engage in dialogue scenarios that build familiarity, share information, and attempt to influence a human participant. The scenarios are variants of the classical “survival task,” where members of a team rank the importance of a number of items (e.g., items that might help one survive a crash in the desert). These are ranked individually and then re-ranked following a team discussion, and the difference in ranking provides an objective measure of social influence. Survival tasks have been used in psychology, virtual human research, and human-robot interaction. Our agents are operated in a “Wizard-of-Oz” fashion, where a hidden human operator chooses the agents’ dialogue actions while interacting with an experiment participant.
Reference:
Niki and Julie: A Robot and Virtual Human for Studying Multimodal Social Interaction (Ron Artstein, David Traum, Jill Boberg, Alesia Gainer, Jonathan Gratch, Emmanuel Johnson, Anton Leuski, Mikio Nakano), In Proceedings of the 18th ACM International Conference on Multimodal Interaction, ACM Press, 2016.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{artstein_niki_2016,
	address = {Tokyo, Japan},
	title = {Niki and {Julie}: {A} {Robot} and {Virtual} {Human} for {Studying} {Multimodal} {Social} {Interaction}},
	isbn = {978-1-4503-4556-9},
	url = {http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2993148.2998532},
	doi = {10.1145/2993148.2998532},
	abstract = {We demonstrate two agents, a robot and a virtual human, which can be used for studying factors that impact social influence. The agents engage in dialogue scenarios that build familiarity, share information, and attempt to influence a human participant. The scenarios are variants of the classical “survival task,” where members of a team rank the importance of a number of items (e.g., items that might help one survive a crash in the desert). These are ranked individually and then re-ranked following a team discussion, and the difference in ranking provides an objective measure of social influence. Survival tasks have been used in psychology, virtual human research, and human-robot interaction. Our agents are operated in a “Wizard-of-Oz” fashion, where a hidden human operator chooses the agents’ dialogue actions while interacting with an experiment participant.},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of the 18th {ACM} {International} {Conference} on {Multimodal} {Interaction}},
	publisher = {ACM Press},
	author = {Artstein, Ron and Traum, David and Boberg, Jill and Gainer, Alesia and Gratch, Jonathan and Johnson, Emmanuel and Leuski, Anton and Nakano, Mikio},
	month = nov,
	year = {2016},
	keywords = {Virtual Humans},
	pages = {402--403}
}
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