Listen to My Body: Does Making Friends Help Influence People? (bibtex)
by Ron Artstein, David Traum, Jill Boberg, Alesia Gainer, Jonathan Gratch, Emmanuel Johnson, Anton Leuski, Mikio Nakano
Abstract:
We investigate the effect of relational dialogue on creating rapport and exerting social influence in human-robot conversation, by comparing interactions with and without a relational component, and with different agent types. Human participants interact with two agents – a Nao robot and a virtual human – in four dialogue scenarios: one involving building familiarity, and three involving sharing information and persuasion in item-ranking tasks. Results show that both agents influence human decision-making; people prefer interacting with the robot, feel higher rapport with the robot, and believe the robot has more influence; and that objective influence of the agent on the person is increased by building familiarity, but is not significantly different between the agents.
Reference:
Listen to My Body: Does Making Friends Help Influence People? (Ron Artstein, David Traum, Jill Boberg, Alesia Gainer, Jonathan Gratch, Emmanuel Johnson, Anton Leuski, Mikio Nakano), In Proceedings of the 30th International Florida Artificial Intelligence Research Society Conference (FLAIRS-30), AAAI, 2017.
Bibtex Entry:
@inproceedings{artstein_listen_2017,
	address = {Marco Island, Florida},
	title = {Listen to {My} {Body}: {Does} {Making} {Friends} {Help} {Influence} {People}?},
	url = {https://aaai.org/ocs/index.php/FLAIRS/FLAIRS17/paper/view/15501/14979},
	abstract = {We investigate the effect of relational dialogue on creating rapport and exerting social influence in human-robot conversation, by comparing interactions with and without a relational component, and with different agent types. Human participants interact with two agents – a Nao robot and a virtual human – in four dialogue scenarios: one involving building familiarity, and three involving sharing information and persuasion in item-ranking tasks. Results show that both agents influence human decision-making; people prefer interacting with the robot, feel higher rapport with the robot, and believe the robot has more influence; and that objective influence of the agent on the person is increased by building familiarity, but is not significantly different between the agents.},
	booktitle = {Proceedings of the 30th {International} {Florida} {Artificial} {Intelligence} {Research} {Society} {Conference} ({FLAIRS}-30)},
	publisher = {AAAI},
	author = {Artstein, Ron and Traum, David and Boberg, Jill and Gainer, Alesia and Gratch, Jonathan and Johnson, Emmanuel and Leuski, Anton and Nakano, Mikio},
	month = may,
	year = {2017},
	keywords = {UARC, Virtual Humans}
}
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